Monthly Archives: August 2013

Tamiya English Tokyo Hobby Show Releases

http://www.tamiya.com/english/THS/ths2013itemindex.htm

1/10 R/C TRF418 Chassis Kit (Tentative)
1/10 R/C Egress (2013) (Tentative)
1/10 XB Porsche 911 Carrera RSR (TT-02)
1/35 R/C JGSDF Type 10 Tank (Tentative)
1/10 R/C TB-04 PRO Chassis Kit
[OP] TB-04 PRO Titanium Screw Set
[OP] TB-04 Front One-Way Set (40T)
[OP] TB-04 Alumimum Ball Differential Set (40T)
[OP] TB-04 Carbon Damper Stay (Front)
[OP] TB-04 Carbon Damper Stay (Rear)
[OP] TB-04 Aluminum Steering Bridge
[OP] TB-04 Aluminum Steering Arms (L/R)
[OP] TB-04 Aluminum Motor Adapter
[OP] Cross Shaft for TB-04 Gear Differential Unit
[OP] Steel Bevel Gears for TB-04 Gear Differential Unit
[OP] Aluminum Cup Joints for TB-04 Gear Differential Unit (Long & Short)
1/10 R/C DB01 RR Chassis Kit
[OP] DB01 RR Lower Deck
1/10 DF-03 MS
1/10 R/C GAZOO Racing TRD 86 (XV-01)
[OP] 1/10 Scale R/C Rally Car Cockpit Set
[TROP] TR Torque-Tuned Motor (33T)
[TROP] Aluminum Shift Servo Mount for Tractor Truck
[TROP] Aluminum Steering Servo Mount & Hi-Torque Servo Saver for Tractor Truck
1/10 R/C WR-02 Chassis Set (Factory Finished)
[OP] CC-01 Aluminum Oil Damper (4pcs.)
[OP] Stroke Extension Link (CC-01)
1/10 XB Zakspeed Turbo Capri Gr.5 Würth (TT-02)
1/10 XB GAZOO Racing TRD 86 (TT-02)
1/10 R/C LaFerrari (TT-02)
1/10 R/C LaFerrari (TB-04)
1/10 XB LaFerrari (TT-02)
1/10 XB GoPro Monster Sport Super Swift (M-05)
[OP] M-05 Aluminum Rear Suspension Mount (1°)
[OP] M-05 Aluminum Counterweight
[OP] M-05 Setting Suspension Arm Set (Front Upper)
[OP] M-Chassis Carbon Body Mount Crossmember
[TRF] R/C Car Body Reamer
[OP] TA06 Carbon Damper Stay (for Short Dampers/Front)
[OP] TA06 Carbon Damper Stay (for Short Dampers/Rear)
[OP] Aluminum Cup Joint for TA06 Gear Differential Unit (2pcs.)
[OP] TA06 Lightweight Front Direct Cup
[TRF] 04 Module Hard Coated Alu. Pinion Gear (31T)
[TRF] 04 Module Hard Coated Alu. Pinion Gear (32T)
[TRF] 04 Module Hard Coated Alu. Pinion Gear (33T)
[TRF] 04 Module Hard Coated Alu. Pinion Gear (34T)
[TRF] 04 Module Hard Coated Alu. Pinion Gear (35T)
[TRF] 04 Module Hard Coated Alu. Pinion Gear (36T)
[TRF] 04 Module Hard Coated Alu. Pinion Gear (37T)
[TRF] 04 Module Hard Coated Alu. Pinion Gear (38T)
[TRF] 04 Module Hard Coated Alu. Pinion Gear (39T)
[LE] 1/10 XB F2012
[LE] FF-03 Aluminum Front Upper Arm Mount

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Satoshi Maezumi TRF201XR/XM in RC World

Scans from the September issue of the excellent RC World magazine of Japan.

TRF201XR / TRF201XM Mag Ad

Japanese mag ad for the TRF201XR and XM conversion kits.

TRF417FF Shakedown

Last night I had the chance to do the first few runs with the TRF417FF test car.

Everything worked well from the start with no reliability or functional problems. After the first short run I had to fit a front roll bar just as expected to tame dawn the front end. As a temporary solution we are using the front roll bar assembly from the Huge FF-11 chassis. Fitted with this the car was already driveable. Following this I placed weights in the car to get it up to the minimum weight and by placing these at the rear the car worked even better and another improvement was fitting the rear roll bar from my TRF417 chassis. With these few changes the car was on pace and feeling very good! 🙂
Further tests and more back-to-back runs with the FF-11 will reveal if the car works as well as this first impression suggests.

How is it different to say the Huge FF-11? Well, based on first impressions it feels like the car is working much more as a complete car and not just a front end. By this I mean that you can actually feel and see that the rear end is working well as well and the car is not as much “on-the-nose” as the FF-11. This means the car stays flatter into and through corners.

Another impression is that the car is very quiet with the gears inside a gearcase and what feels like a very efficient drivetrain. Further to that the car has a lot of steering and the steering feels very direct and linear.

So overall a very good shakedown for the TRF417FF and I look forward to testing it further. No doubt I will be running this car more… 🙂

FinTrack Round 3 of Summer Series

Last Sunday I went to round 3, the last one, of our summer national series here in Finland. This was a race I long did not plan to go because it was the last weekend of my holiday and I don’t really enjoy the track, but then decided go afterall to what will be the last race with the TRF417 V5 for me.

The day before the race it rained and on raceday morning the track was still damp in places. This made the conditions tricky and since I had not run on the track since 2010 I would have needed a bit of running on the Saturday to catch up. The car was not good in the beginning but changing the diffs to softer ones front and rear + some small other changes transformed it making the car quite good in the end.

One new thing since the last race was that I made a new slimmer and more flexing upper deck (see pictures), whcih I back-to-backed at this race and it was definitely an improvement so it stayed on.

Below the setup I used and a picture of the track.

Tamiya TRF418 CAD Pictures & Details

Translated text:

All the main parts redesigned!

Carbon parts:
– lower deck / upper deck / front and rear damper stays / bumper support

Resin parts:
– uprights / front and rear suspension arms / spur gear

Aluminum parts:
– front and rear lower and upper bulkhead / motor mount / steering wiper / Direct shaft Cup / integrated servo mount / suspension mounts / Separate Suspension Mount / 20T center pulley / Stabilizer / stabilizer end / damper spring

No.170 TRF series TRF418 [tentative]

See also Further TRF418 Information which I posted on Monday.

More FF-03 Evo Pictures

Further TRF418 Information

This advanced racing chassis is the successor to the TRF417 chassis series, which has served TRF magnificently since its 2010 debut, securing the elite team numerous race victories including a third IFMAR ISTC World Championships in a row and unprecedented fifth overall.

Now, with next year’s 2014 version of the World Championships on the horizon, the new TRF418 is ready to take its place. It represents the first complete overhaul that Tamiya’s top racing chassis has undergone in three years. Honed through countless tests using cutting-edge power sources, tires, and thanks to the feedback of TRF works drivers Marc Rheinard, Viktor Wilck and of course reigning World Champion Jilles Groskamp, the chassis can boast an almost 100% new design.

Tamiya is constantly pushing the limits of R/C racing technology in an effort to stay ahead of the pack and secure the TRF team’s sixth title, and the TRF418 promises to be another success story.

About the Model
• Front and rear lower bulkheads feature identical design, while upper arms have an optimal attachment angle.
• Center bulkhead is separate from upper deck, optimizing chassis roll characteristics.
• Features redesigned front/rear suspension arms with attachment points in dedicated racing positions only.
• A weight reduction of 2g has been achieved with lighter direct coupling.
• Newly-designed stabilizers are now attached using ball connectors.
• New steering arms offer a more linear steering feel.
• Includes a 20T pinion gear for a secondary gear reduction ratio of 1.85 (minimizing speed loss when throttle
is disengaged.)

※ More in-depth information to follow soon.

TRF417FF Test Car

As promised, here a closer look at the TRF417FF project car mentioned in my previous post.

The idea for this construction came up early this year, as usual pretty much by coincidence, but what it really boils down to is that Tamiya have not yet built a proper TRF-style FF FWD chassis so we had to do something about it!

The reason the idea has been realised is that when the XV-01 chassis was released I had a look at the front gearbox and bumper of that car and liked the fact that it had a very short overhang at the front with a short lower deck compared to the FF cars available. Something I have never liked about the FF cars (FF-03, FF11, FF12 etc.) is that the lower deck is very long at the front and the motor not pushed as far back as I would like. This results in a lower deck constantly scraping the ground at the front – quickly wearing out, and limits the ride heights you can run. And anyone who has followed full scale FWD TC racing, or just using common sense really, understand that you want to push the motor as far back towards the diff as possible while also keeping it as low as possible. So when I looked at the XV-01 bumper and then proceeded to fit it to my TRF417 chassis, realising that it fit perfectly, that’s when this project came alive. And that’s the coincidence part…

This realisation of course set my brain thinking, and we then proceeded in trying to produce a car of these parts together with my brother (the one with the necessary skills in actually designing the parts…:) ).

The reason we decided to go ahead with this is that we only had to make a new lower and upper deck. The rest of the parts are TRF417 parts and XV-01 parts and most of these I had as spare parts already. This way we could also use most of the latest TC design trends on an FF chassis, something that has not really been available so far. Of course, there is no guarantee they will work as well in this configuration, but at least the steering and servo mount together with the TRF417 rear end should work well. Therfore we also decided to make the lower and upper decks very close to the original TRF417 V5 shape.

The other features were as you will have understood to keep the motor as far back as possible and the front lower deck as short as possible, these features made possible by the XV-01 parts. Of course there are challenges, and on this project one is that on the original XV-01 the motor is too high up, obviously to keep it as far back as possible. If you want to lower it you quickly hit the front suspension block followed by the high upper surface of the bumper. Here’s also in my eyes the limitation of this project car, the other perhaps being having to mount to front part of the upper deck to a plastic gearbox/bulkhead where you would ideally want aluminium. To really optimise the motor position you would need new front arms and/or suspension mounting system to allow you to lower the motor as much as possible. But this is a test car made using available parts. Still, we wanted to lower the motor as much as possible and by removing material from the front suspension block and bumper, as well as machining the motor mount we achieved a good solution lowering the motor as much as possible while keeping it as far back as possible using the current parts.

Below some Pictures showing the car so far with a few comments.
Test drive not yet done, will be interesting.


Here you can see that we used a XV-01 carbon damper stay, mounted upside down to get the correct height while using normal length TRF damper shafts. Obviously, if the car goes well we can make a custom designed part. You can also see that the arms are mounted as far forward as possible to keep the motor as far back relative to the wheels. Upper arm mount integrated into the upper deck as it was the most simple and effective solution at this stage.


Standard TRF417 rear end with split suspension blocks. The upper deck mounted with spacers to match the XV-01 front gearbox height.


In these pictures the the motor mount and suspension mount/bumper has not yet been modified to lower the motor.


A good picture to show that the motor position with this gearbox/motor mount is as far back as possible as well as showing the short front bumper. You can also see the TRF417 V5 floating servo mount.


Again you can see the short bumper and how short the front of the lower deck is compared to common FF cars. You can also see that we made a few slots to allow different battery positions. This car will be run with and was designed for shorty packs.


This is what it looks like with the electronics, tyres and foam bumper mounted.


Here you can see the lowered motor.

Again you can see the lowered motor, better in this shot.


Material also removed from the lowest edge of the bumper to make it fit this chassis better.


As you can see the motor is mounted slightly to the left using the XV-01 parts. Ideally it would be more centered.

The TRF417FF Project

Will post more on this Project car soon, but here a preview.